July 20, 2020 Slideshows » News

Shelter In Place Hikes 

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Photo by Mark Larson
The Bear River Ridge Road walk is located off the "Wildcat" Road above Ferndale – recommend walking this scenic open-range road when the wind isn't blowing.
Photo by Mark Larson
The Bear River Ridge Road.
Photo by Mark Larson
The South Fork Janes Creek Loop connects with Trail No. 10 in the Arcata Community Forest. The closest trailhead is on West End Road.
Photo by Mark Larson
The walk on the Elk River Trail into Headwaters Forest passes under beautiful big leaf maples along the creek for 2 miles before heading uphill through logged-over forest and finally ending in an old growth redwood forest trail loop (pick up a map at the trailhead). Keep your eye out for covered bridges on adjacent roads as you drive to the trailhead on Elk River Road.
Photo by Mark Larson
Temporary bridges cross the Eel River in the summer. This one gives access to the Garden Club of America Grove from Avenue of the Giants.
Photo by Mark Larson
Head south to the Avenue of the Giants for a walk into the Garden Club of America Grove.
Photo by Mark Larson
Renowned architect Julia Morgan (1872-1957) used natural materials and simplicity in the design of this "Four Fireplaces" structure located at the Women's Federation Grove off of the Avenue of the Giants.
Photo by Mark Larson
A walk near the "Four Fireplaces" structure takes you to an albino redwood.
Photo by Mark Larson
We enjoy walking through old cemeteries. The Table Bluff Cemetery is east of Loleta at the north end of Singley Hill Road.
Photo by Mark Larson
Table Bluff Cemetery.
Photo by Mark Larson
Go out the back NW corner exit of Costco and walk to Old Town on the west part of the Eureka Waterfront Trail and back. This wonderful redevelopment hiking trail combines a close look at remnants of the forest-products industry and the railroad lines and a walk by current fishing and crabbing activity. My eye was converting much of the scenery to B&W and looking for flowers and color among the rust and concrete. Oh, and I learned what the word "Wharfinger" on that building means (the operator or manager of a commercial wharf).
Photo by Mark Larson
Along the Eureka Waterfront Trail.
Photo by Mark Larson
Industrial form and color on the Eureka Waterfront Trail.
Photo by Mark Larson
We enjoyed a long walk around the Humboldt Botanical Garden at the College of the Redwoods and found some of our favorite flowers as well as some new ones in bloom. Everyone is required to wear a mask and only 50 people are allowed in at one time, so go early.
Photo by Mark Larson
A long walk around the Humboldt Botanical Garden at the College of the Redwoods included Peter Santino's "All Happy Now" earth sculpture at the top of the garden. It merges two ancient architectural features, the ziggurat and the labyrinth.
Photo by Mark Larson
The "Wildcat" Road to Petrolia from Ferndale includes a spectacular view looking south toward the Lost Coast and Petrolia.
Photo by Mark Larson
Who knew? In the Petrolia Table Cemetery is a world-record Blue Gum Eucalyptus at 49 feet in circumference, 141 feet tall and a 126-foot spread. It is massive!
Photo by Mark Larson
South of the public telephone booth in Petrolia is an sign describing a short walk to the Pioneer Cemetery. Definitely worth the walk. The earliest date on a gravestone is 1857 for a 11-month-old child.
Photo by Mark Larson
South of Petrolia, take the Lighthouse Road west to the campground/parking area and walk north on the ocean beach to the mouth of the Mattole River. It feels very wild there.
Photo by Mark Larson
Highly recommended – the north unit of the Ma-le'l Dunes off of Young Lane on Highway 255 in Manila (no dogs or horses allowed). The next-door south unit allows dogs and horses.
Photo by Mark Larson
A first-time visit to Shelter Cove should include a walk on the beach where fishermen launch the boats.
Photo by Mark Larson
Shelter Cove offers either a day hike or the south end trailhead of the Lost Coast Trail on Black Sands Beach. Hikers usually walk the ocean beach trail south due to prevailing winds and carefully time low tides to pass otherwise impassable sections of the trail.
Photo by Mark Larson
An unusual tunnel tree straddles the Hope Creek trail in Redwood National Park. Lots of wildflowers on this loop trail with Ten Taypo Trail in old growth redwoods.
Photo by Mark Larson
Sometimes a new discovery can be only a few blocks from home. We found this Camp Curtis plaque (California State Historic Landmark #215) at 3501 L K Blvd. in Arcata. The Camp served as the headquarters and garrison of the 1st Battalion California Volunteer Mountaineers from 1862 to 1865. The plaque fails to tell the sad history of Native American deaths at the hands of the settlers and military. It also includes a typographical error ("Calvary" for "Cavalry"), and a date error: According to her tombstone in Greenwood Cemetery, Marie Brazard Todd was born in 1848 not 1847.
Photo by Mark Larson
We found recent BLM graffiti along the South Fork Janes Creek trail in the Arcata Community Forest.
Photo by Mark Larson
We got all our ducks in a row (standing on floats) in the oxidation ponds at the Arcata Marsh & Wildlife Sanctuary.
Photo by Mark Larson
The east end of the Eureka Waterfront Trail takes you under U.S. Highway 101 with a view north to Humboldt Bay and the railroad trestle. Good access to the trail is behind the Target store.
Photo by Mark Larson
We always drove by the trailhead for Trillium Falls on our way to Fern Canyon in the past. Now we'll stop here for a beautiful hike in old growth redwoods, lots of trillium and the only waterfall in Redwood National Park.
Photo by Mark Larson
We enjoyed the hike to the mouth of Redwood Creek either by the ocean beach from the Redwood National Park visitor center south of Orick or on the north levee at the bridge in Orick.
Photo by Mark Larson
We have enjoyed the walk around the oxidation ponds at the Arcata Marsh & Wildlife Sanctuary many times now because of the frequent sightings of ducks (like this wood duck) and geese.
Photo by Mark Larson
One unusual sighting west of Petrolia next to the road are these "hebras" (a cross between a horse and a zebra).
Photo by Mark Larson
The huge dunes at the Ma-le'l Dunes North Unit are slowly migrating into the forest adjacent to Humboldt Bay.
Photo by Mark Larson
We recommend starting the Hikshari' Trail at the parking area west of U.S. Highway 101 south of Eureka at Herrick Avenue and walking north toward the Eureka Waterfront Trail and back. It provides an unusual and interesting look first of the Elk River Slough and then of the outskirts of commercial use of Humboldt Bay.
Photo by Mark Larson
A graffiti song lyric reflecting the times greeted us on the Hikshari' Trail.
Photo by Mark Larson
We enjoyed multiple visits this spring to Elk Head north of Trinidad watching the Columbia lilies and other wildflowers come in to bloom, but missed seeing any whales. The trail is heavily used.
Photo by Mark Larson
The heavily used trail to Elk Head provides a great view south to College Cove (trail to the beach begins here) and the city of Trinidad and Trinidad Head.
Photo by Mark Larson
We enjoyed the hike to the mouth of Redwood Creek either by the ocean beach from the Redwood National Park visitor center or on the north levee starting at the bridge in Orick.
Photo by Mark Larson
The Hookton Slough hike out and back along Salmon Creek and the Humboldt Bay Wildlife Refuge is a flat, accessible trail ... but avoid a windy day.
Photo by Mark Larson
On our only trip inland this spring, we enjoyed the drive up to Horse Mountain and the hike into Cold Springs (go early to the meadow area when the wildflowers are in bloom) and then west to Split Rock (popular with rock climbers).
Photo by Mark Larson
The Lyons Ranch trail from Bald Hills Road in Redwood National Park offers a scenic south-exposure walk on an old road into the ranch area that includes this old barn.
Photo by Mark Larson
We finally got around to walking the Hammond Trail in McKinleyville north to the lookout over the mouth of the Mad River along Highway 101. Harbor seals lined the bank of the river on this day.
Photo by Mark Larson
The walk along Bear River Ridge Road offers spectacular views to the south and over the ocean as the morning fog burns off.
Photo by Mark Larson
We regularly walk the trails at the Arcata Marsh & Wildlife Refuge with its accessble walking and biking trails and lots of wildlife. We recently saw an otter at the Brackish Pond.
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Photo by Mark Larson
The Bear River Ridge Road walk is located off the "Wildcat" Road above Ferndale – recommend walking this scenic open-range road when the wind isn't blowing.

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